search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
River restoration has been at the heart of some


of the West’s most vibrant small communities, including Salida, Colorado, whose riverfront has gone through multiple phases of improvement, San Marcos, Texas, and Buena Vista, Colorado, where pro paddlers turned developers Jed Selby and Katie Urban created an idyllic neighborhood on the Arkansas River. A new whitewater park on the Deschutes River has the outdoor community buzzing in Bend, Oregon. Testimonials to the economic potential of


river parks are convincing. For instance, the Vail Whitewater Park on Gore Creek hosts freestyle and downriver events for the GoPro Mountain Games each June. The 2015 festival attracted over 60,000 spectators and contributed nearly $5 million to the local economy in one weekend alone. An economic study in Golden pegged the value of the town’s whitewater park at up to $2 million annually with 40,000 visitors; and Reno, Nevada’s reclaimed Truckee River generates up to $2.5 million in commercial rafting revenue per year. Essentially, urban whitewater attractions on


natural waterways are an extension of the long paddling tradition of negotiating deals with util- ity companies and scheduling events for water releases. The difference, says Sigle, is that prop- erly engineered river upgrades offer better access, optimized conditions for freestyle and downriver boating, and greater safety. Surf waves and slalom gates comprise only part


of the typical whitewater park experience. Most include some combination of bike paths, play ar- eas, fishing holes and outdoor concert venues and restaurants. In fact, a 2011 study revealed that a full 75 percent of visitors to whitewater parks don’t venture on the water. They come to introduce their children to nature, to get a dose of fresh air over lunch hour, or to simply enjoy the sight and sound of flowing water. That only 25 percent of users paddle isn’t a concern to Sigle. “When I show up to talk about whitewater


parks in small town Iowa,” says Sigle, who drew up the plans for both Charles City and Manches- ter, “there’s always a bunch of people in the audi- ence ready to throw tomatoes at me. But the sell isn’t exclusively whitewater. It’s about providing a beautiful amenity downtown, with trails and plac- es for people to sit and fish. In the end, we find that the people who at first opposed the project come back with the biggest cheers.”


ON WATER AT THE $50 MILLION LEE VALLEY WHITE WATER CENTRE IN ENGLAND. PHO T O: SETH ASHW ORTH


46 | RAPID


PHO T O : GORDON RAYNER


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68