This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Our scouting team included two expert whitewater canoe guides, two


Parks Canada employees, including Lyn, and a second writer and photog- rapher who was also a seasoned paddler. Everyone else had an air of confidence I didn’t share. I was cleanly shav-


en, with a short crew cut and gelled hair, sporting my shiny new Bergans gear I’d received specifically for the trip. My paddling background equated to flatwater canoe trips with Scouts


in my early teens. The only reason I was here was because my photogra- phy portfolio had impressed Lyn enough to ignore my lack of paddling skills. Having worked in conflict zones as a photojournalist, I figured I’d be able to handle a little canoe trip, but looking at my companions I started to think I had made a mistake. I knew nothing about whitewater paddling, little about tripping, and the journey down the Little Nahanni’s almost constant class II to IV rapids would be my first expedition. Before we set off, Lyn had reviewed Hans Baer’s trip journal, one of the


first known paddlers to have descended the Little Nahanni in 1972. In one particular entry, Baer’s party had just arrived at the Little Nahanni, and met a couple men from the local tungsten mine. Baer wrote: “A young chap who stopped by for a while inquired what we were up to. He was


very pessimistic about our Little Nahanni adventure and told us that he had heard of parties trying to get down the river, but apparently all of them had come walking back up, and he knew of nobody who had actually made it. Also, he thought that nobody had tried it this year. Well, this didn’t sound too encouraging.” I couldn’t help but agree.


THE BEST TIME TO PADDLE THE LITTLE NAHANNI IS FROM MID-JUNE TO MID-AUGUST. PLAN FOR EIGHT TO 12 DAYS.


THANKS TO THIS TRIP, PARKS CANADA’S TRIP PLANNER INCLUDES GPS POINTS FOR RAPIDS AND POINTS OF INTEREST.


CAMPSITES ARE A MIX OF ROCKY SHORES AND SANDY SITES. 44 | Canoeroots


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68