What's In: Sarah and Boomer's Tiny Home | Adventure Kayak Magazine | Rapid Media
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What's In: Sarah and Boomer's Tiny Home Photo: Erik Boomer

Taking a peek inside the adventurer's tiny home that allows them to live wherever they want to play

When you're used to fitting everything you need into two kayak hatches and living out of a tent for months at a time, 280 square feet of walls-and-windows comfort seems positively luxurious. Radical downsizing may be one of the founding tenets of the tiny house movement, but adventurers Erik Boomer and Sarah McNair-Landry are no strangers to doing more with less. They sketched the floor plan for their diminutive dream home while on a four-month dogsledding expedition around Baffin Island. Last winter, the couple began construction of a cozy home-on-wheels that’s as mobile as their lives: touring the Pacific Northwest one month, parked in an idyllic clearing by the river the next. “It’s our way of living where we want to play,” says McNair-Landry.  

GET A GURU

The DIYers welcomed the guidance of fellow paddler and master tiny house builder Rob Sickler, who appeared with Boomer in the acclaimed film, Wildwater. Creating an adventure-ready abode is “kinda like making a fort when you’re a kid,” says McNair-Landry, “but way sweeter.”

ELBOW GREASE

After purchasing an eight-by-20-foot trailer, Boomer and McNair-Landry raised the shell in snowy McCall, Idaho, and then towed their home to Sickler’s Hot Rod Housing workshop in Leadville, Colorado, to complete the interior finishes. Five months and $25,000 later, they were ready to roll. The price for a mortgage-free home is a lot of hard work, says McNair-Landry. “Just like an expedition, we had difficult moments and we had to remind each other to keep moving forward one step at a time.”

REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLE

Tiny homes are all about sustainable architecture. Repurposing and upcycling old materials are key to keeping the environmental footprint and building costs to a minimum. Boomer and McNair-Landry’s home is clad in reclaimed corrugated metal panels and barn board. “In 1833, it was on a barn in Illinois,” says Boomer, “now it’s on an adventure across...

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